Why businesses are taking the personal approach

You never get a second chance to make a first impression. It’s a well-known, even cliched, term, that reminds us that our initial interaction with a person or thing has a highly weighted impact on future contact with them or it.

It’s as true in business as it is in life.

No-one can argue with the logic, but how often do we consider maintaining that first impression? What if you could keep on building on that first impression with a second, third, tenth, 100th impression, and so on.

And because many of your business interactions will start with a piece of stationery, we’ve set out some points to help you make all your impressions stand out.

Go classic

The classic printing techniques (letterpress, foil blocking, thermography, embossing and die stamping) give you a massive head start on your competitors due their impact. Yes, they’re a little bit more expensive than flat printing, but remember you’re making that first impression over and over, with the people who spend their money with you!

Flat printing offers speed and economy in quantity, but we’re talking personal service here, where texture, heritage and craftsmanship carry a message of their own. It says ‘we care about you’.

And remember ‘flat‘ printing isn’t called that for nothing.

Get personal

These classic techniques are widely used for printing personal stationery, and that just sums up they’re raison d’etre. They’re designed for conveying the personal messages.

The advent of typewriters, then computers, now mobile phones have pushed out the delicate art of writing personal notes to each other.

Yet it’s probably more popular than you realise. A large chunk of out order book is personalised stationery, and increasingly, we’re seeing more businesses shun the typed letter or emailed note, in favour of slowing down and doing it with care and attention.

And with very good results. Customers certainly appreciate the personal touch.

Handwriting is handcrafting

Why would you get hand-made stationery, and then run it through a laser printer, or type on it? It just depersonalises it.

Our paper stock is carefully selected by us, to provide the perfect medium for pen and ink.

Our processes were invented before typewriters, computers and phones existed. They’re steeped in history, and it’s a not only a joy to write on, it’s a joy to read as well.

Writing notes to your customers instead of sending emails shows you are spending time on them. They’re more likely to be read and absorbed, more likely to be kept, and you’re more likely to start a trend. Just watch and see if your customer writes back to you.

Be one of the first to set the trend!

What can you send?

We know that businesspeople are busy, and writing notes takes a little extra time, but we think you’ll find it worthwhile. Here’s a few ideas to get you thinking

Envelopes

Let’s start at the very beginning… Don’t hand-write a letter, then type the envelope. Envelopes are as important as the letter. The way you write your customer’s name could have a very personal impact on them. And it lifts your letter to the top of the pile, meaning your letters are more likely to get opened first.

Letters

That’s obvious, but equally a full side of A4 is a daunting propect. The A5 letterhead is perfect for handwriting because it saves on space and and easier to fill with a swashy signature without looking over the top.

Correspondence cards

These are very popular personal items, and as they’re on card not paper, they make excellent medium for notes to be kept for longer. Use them as thank you cards, nice-to-meet-you cards, invitations, all sorts of notes. They’re much bigger than business cards so there’s more room for personalised messages, but not as daunting as letterheads. You can use them with or without envelopes.

Forms

Turn the tables and get your customer to do the writing. Send them a form to fill in.

Give them a chance to break the monotony, provide an incentive and get some data. If you hand-write the invitation to fill it in, it’s a subliminal message to join the handwriting club.

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